Scalping your Lawn

Scalping your lawn means mowing your lawn down to 1″ and removing the dormant layer. Warm season lawns should be scalped once a year in the spring (March). This will help to decrease thatch, improve spring green-up, help control spring weeds, and improve the appearance of your lawn all season.  How to Scalp  Make sure your mower blade is ...
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Watering your Lawn

Proper water techniques are often misunderstood. As a general guideline, lawns only need 1″ to 1.5″ inches of water per week. It's best to water 1 to 2 times per week early in the morning to achieve this goal. Watering for a longer period of time less frequently soaking the soil to a 6″ to 8″ depth will promote a deeper root system and improve drought tolerance. Short frequent watering will cause shallow rooting. Shallow rooting will lead to poor drought tolerance and increase disease susceptibility. Its best to water your lawn and landscape plants early in the morning before the sun rises. This will allow time for the water to soak into the soil before evaporation can occur. 

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Fireweed (American Burnweed)

Fireweed is a nuisance weed that pops up every spring in Georgia. This rapidly growing weed has a shallow root system and germinates in the thatch layer of lawns. Although easily controlled by post-emergent herbicide treatments, pre-emergent treatments have no effect on this invasive weed. Proper lawn maintenance practices provide the most effective means of control. Weekly mowing with a sharp mower blade at the proper mowing height will minimize Fireweed infestations. Managing your thatch layer is also important. Compacted soil and improper mowing practices can lead to excessive thatch. Spring core aeration will relieve compaction and help manage your thatch layer.

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Leaf-Cycling

Step towards a better environment, and a way to help your soil, too

We realize once again that there is no such thing as a free lunch. After enjoying the show, the performers fall down on us and leaf raking time is back. 

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Plant Health Care

Health care is getting a lot of attention these days. Almost every day, we're hearing about new ways to live longer and better. The maintenance of our energy and vitality is being recognized as the key to improved health.

The idea of concentrating on prevention, rather than cure, can easily apply to much more than humans. Prevention also plays an important part in the maintenance of your lawn. And one of the best ways to maintain your lawn's health is to practice Plant Health Care. 

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Stop Annual Grasses Before They Start

 The season can be saved with pre-emergent controls

Annual grasses like crabgrass are extremely aggressive. Without treatment, they'll thin and choke out your good grass as they compete for growing space in your lawn. In just a few years, you could be left with little or no healthy turf.
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Don’t forget to water!

As the Weather Gets Hotter, Don't Forget to Water 

Lawns, trees, shrubs and flowers need adequate water to thrive, and the summer months are the time to be especially aware of your landscape's watering needs. Remember that how often plants need to be watered is closely related to how deep their roots are. 

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Are You Watering Correctly?

There's no magic to watering properly. It's really just a matter of ensuring that the water you do supply to your lawn, trees and shrubs is used efficiently.

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Keep your landscape hydrated!

Keeping your lawn thick, green and healthy means doing several things right. The most important is making sure there's enough moisture to maintain growth. This is especially the case with newly seeded lawns.

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Fighting Crabgrass

It Doesn't Have to Be an Uphill Battle

There's no doubt about it…crabgrass is a worthy opponent in the quest to keep your lawn looking its best. This very common turfgrass invader can seriously detract from the beauty and health of your lawn if left untreated. With proper treatments and good lawn care habits, though, crabgrass can be kept under control. The trick is to take care of the problem before the seeds get a chance to sprout.

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Preventing Grub Damage

When you do all the things necessary to achieve a healthy and robust lawn, you also make your lawn incredibly attractive to one of its biggest enemies. Turf grass needs thick juicy roots in order to thrive. The healthier the roots, the more appetizing they are to grubs.

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Core Aeration

Core aeration. It may sound complex, but it's really simple. An aerator punches out cores, or plugs of soil about a half-inch wide and three inches long, across your whole lawn. This lets moisture, nutrients, and most of all, oxygen reach your turf's roots. Aeration also breaks up thatch build-up – that layer of dead grass and debris between the soil and grass that blocks water and fertilizers.

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Getting the Drop on Mosquitoes

Nothing takes the fun out of an evening barbecue outdoors like a bunch of bloodthirsty mosquitoes. In addition to inflicting a painful bite, mosquitoes can transmit diseases. Because mosquitoes require water to breed, here are some practical ways to eliminate water sources in your yard: 

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Giving Grubs the Snub

Ever laid eyes on a grub? If so, you know how ugly these pests are. Even uglier, though, is the damage they can do to your lawn. Grubs are the unfortunate offspring of beetles, such as June beetles and Japanese beetles, and they hatch from eggs laid in the soil. After hatching, the grubs (or beetle larvae) start feeding on turf roots. 

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Understanding lawn disease

Every lawn in Georgia, new or established, is susceptible to a variety of disease. Promoting healthy growth is the best way to prevent a severe disease outbreak. Most common lawn diseases can be avoided by optimizing mowing and watering practices. Stressed grass is much more susceptible to disease than healthy grass. 

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Lawn Disease Control

Every lawn in Georgia, whether new or established, is susceptible to a variety of lawn diseases because of our environmental conditions.

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Insect Invasion

The coming of spring means the coming of a variety of insects. Certain insects such as Grubs, Spittle Bugs, Aphids, and scale can be detrimental to your lawn and landscape. Other insects such as Fleas, Ticks, Fire Ants, and Mosquitoes pose no threat to your lawn but can be hazardous to your health and the health of your pets. 

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Large Patch Disease

This time of year, warm-season turf grass, especially zoysia, often suffers from large patch disease. This fungal disease appears as large, circular patches of discolored orange or yellow turf. If left unchecked, it will continue to spread, damaging or killing the turf it infects.

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Spring Fungal Disease

Dollar Spot

Dollar spot affects a wide variety of grasses and will likely make an appearance soon in warm-season turf such as Bermuda and zoysia grass. The fungus is active throughout the growing season, especially when there is low soil moisture and excess surface moisture. This fungal disease, which is most common in the spring and summer, appears as small white patches that are 1-3 inches in diameter (about the size of a silver dollar). Sometimes, a large number of spots can come together and form larger brown areas.
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Healthy Lawns Lead to a Healthier Environment!

Did you know that your lawn can have a positive impact on your health and the environment. Here are just a few of the many benefits of keeping your lawn healthy: 

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